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Websites That Promote Open Educational Resources (OER)

Published onJun 22, 2021
Websites That Promote Open Educational Resources (OER)

This page provides a curated list of websites that promote Open Educational Resources (OER). They include information on the utility of OER; libraries for finding it; guides to making it; and, platforms for sharing it. To suggest an addition to the list, or report a problem with it, please email us. If you are somewhat new to OER, great places to start are SPARC’s page for Open Education; The Cape Town Open Education Declaration; and, the documentary Paywall: The Business of Scholarship.

Note that a separate page will be made that lists OER specific to criminology.


BCcampus OpenEd Resources. Include information on: What is Open Education?; Browse Our [Open Textbook] Collections; Use Open Textbooks and Courses; Create Open Textbooks; Advocate for Open Education; Projects and Grants.

Caselaw Access Project (CAP). “The Caselaw Access Project (“CAP”) expands public access to U.S. law. Our goal is to make all published U.S. court decisions freely available to the public online, in a consistent format, digitized from the collection of the Harvard Law School Library.” 

Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources. Includes information on: Learn (e.g., Why Open Education; Open Licenses; Find OER; Adopt OER; OER Tutorials; Webinars; OER Research); Plan; OER Degrees; and, Get Involved.

Creative Commons. Includes information on: Creative Commons licenses and public domain tools; CC Global Network; CC Search; Creative Commons Certificate; CC Summit.

data.gov. “The home of the U.S. Government’s open data[.] Here you will find data, tools, and resources to conduct research, develop web and mobile applications, design data visualizations, and more.”

Digital Public Library of America. “[A]mplifies the value of libraries and cultural organizations as Americans’ most trusted sources of shared knowledge. We do this by collaborating with partners to accelerate innovative tools and ideas that empower and equip libraries to make information more accessible.”

Europeana. “Europeana works with thousands of European archives, libraries and museums to share cultural heritage for enjoyment, education and research. This website gives you access to millions of books, music, artworks and more[.]”

H20. “Build a better case book. H20 helps law faculty create high quality, open-licensed digital textbooks for free.”

HathiTrust. “[A] not-for-profit collaborative of academic and research libraries preserving 17+ million digitized items. HathiTrust offers reading access to the fullest extent allowable by U.S. copyright law, computational access to the entire corpus for scholarly research, and other emerging services based on the combined collection.”

Internet Archive. “[A] non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, software, music, websites, and more.” Includes Wayback Machine.

MERLOT. “The MERLOT system provides access to curated online learning and support materials and current creation tools, led by an international community of educators, learners and researchers.”

National Science Digital Library. “[P]rovides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings.”

OER Commons. “OER Commons is a public digital library of open educational resources. Explore, create, and collaborate with educators around the world to improve curriculum.”

OER Hub. Includes information on: Case studies [in OER]; Current [OER research] projects; Research & outputs (e.g., publications, presentations, infographics, datasets, open courses, and researchers pack).

OER World Map. “The OER World Map collects and visualizes data on the growing number of actors and activities in the field of open education worldwide. The goal is to accelerate the evolution of the global OER ecosystem by providing a comprehensive and responsive picture of the OER movement.”

OpenStax. “We publish high-quality, peer-reviewed, openly licensed college textbooks that are absolutely free online and low cost in print.”

Open Education Global. “Open Education Global (OEG) is a global, members based, non-profit organization supporting the development and use of open education around the world.”

Open Education Network. “When you join the Open Education Network, you become part of a supportive community that works together to make higher education more open.”

Open Education Policy Network. “Our network supports development of open education policies in order to create a friendly and creative policy
environment for open education. We are based in Central and Eastern Europe, focus on European policies and think globally.”

Open Textbook Library. Search and download “[o]pen textbooks [that] are licensed by authors and publishers to be freely used and adapted. Download, edit and distribute them at no cost.”

Project Gutenberg. “Project Gutenberg is a library of over 60,000 free eBooks.”

PubPub. “PubPub supports each part of the publishing process, from drafting documents, conducting peer review, and hosting entire journal and book websites, to collecting and displaying reader feedback and analytics. PubPub is nonprescriptive and flexible, so that authors can freely experiment with different types of processes and tools, including overlay journals, open access publishing, and beyond.”

Rebus Community. “You can use this platform to: start an open textbook project; give and receive guidance on publishing open textbooks; post and respond to calls for contributors; and connect with global communities that are changing the world through Open Education.” Includes Faculty OER Toolkit; Authoring Open Textbooks; and, A Guide to Making Open Textbooks with Students;

SPARC, Open Education. Includes information on: Open Education Leadership Program; LibOER Discussion Group; Connect OER; OER State Policy Resources; OER Digest; and, OER Mythbusting.

Teaching Resources and Innovations Library for Sociology. “[O]ffers thousands of pedagogical gifts (Good Ideas For Teaching Sociology). It's also the perfect place to publish your own teaching resources.”

UNESCO, Open Educational Resources. Includes information on: UNESCO Recommendation on OER; OER Dynamic Coalition; and, Resources (e.g., speaker presentations, framework documents, publications, etc.).

US Library of Congress. “The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, newspapers, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.”

US National Archives. “Teach with documents using our online tool. Locate teachable primary sources. Find new and favorite lessons, and create your own online or print activities for your students.”

US Office of Open Education, Go Open District Launch Pack. Outlines “a systematic approach to incorporating openly licensed educational resources into their curriculum.”

Wikipedia. “Wikipedia is a free, multilingual online enyclopedia written and maintained by a community of volunteer contributors through a model of open collaboration, using a wiki-based editing system. Wikipedia is the largest and most-read reference work in history.”

Wikimedia Commons. “Wikimedia Commons is a media file repository making available public domain and freely licensed educational media content (images, sound and video clips) to everyone, in their own language.”

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